• Anda Dapat Menyelamatkan

    Flora dan Fauna Endemik Kepulauan Aru

    Dengan bergabung dalam Kampanye #SaveAru
  • It’s time for us to rise our voice

    And join the campaign for saving Aru islands

    500,000 ha of Aru Forest is gonna be destroyed
  • Our hands might be tied, but not our minds
    Do not let more destruction of our nature go by a unnoticed! Lets stand

    Let’s Stand Together for protecting Aru Islands

    To all Environment lovers
  • Don’t let it be converted to sugar cane plantation

    Share your contribution right now!

    Protect The Unique Nature Of Aru Islands

Save Aru Islands

Aru is a cluster of 300 small tinny islands where greatest birds of paradise are living harmoniously with kangaroos, black cockatoos & crocodile. This heavenly place is threatened to be destroyed recently by a stupid & greedy plan of our government to develop 500 000 hectares of sugar cane plantation across this region. Please stand in solidarity with us to SAVE ARU ISLANDS!


Save Aru (Tribute Song to #SaveAru Islands) MHC - Wessly

Lagu yg didekasikan kepada perjuangan Rakyat Aru untuk melawan perampokan tanah-tanah mereka yg mau diubah menjadi kebun tebu. Keep Stand in with us to #SaveAruIslands
Enter the rainforest canopy of the Aru Islands to watch the coordinated displays of two male Greater Birds-of-Paradise. Then see two females take particular interest in the males' bright colors, strange sounds, and contorted poses. Filmed by Tim Laman in September 2010.

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In Solidarity With Aru Islands

I have no idea to express what I’ve really felt when entering the interior of Aru Islands, the easternmost corner of Maluku Province. The landscape is really beautiful. Sailing with a traditional wooden boat, I found the riverside is flanked by amazing mangrove that grows abundantly. Simple villages beyond the fog were extremely peaceful. Fog in the river is a common occurrence but more-so during the dawn. The view was both amazing and mysterious.

Consists of more than 250 islands, Aru archipelago is well known as the only region in Maluku where 4 species of golden birds of paradise are living in harmony with Black Cockatoo, Tree Kangaroo, Cassowary, Deer, and indigenous forest people, those who depend on the forest for at least 75% of their daily needs. However, Aru Islands is a portrait of peaceful suffer and poverty. Although living the beautiful and richness environment, the poverty rate decreased for indigenous people up to 50%.

Unfortunately, instead of developing projects to improve the lives of people living in poverty, crazy policy of Maluku government allowed a greedy investment of 28 companies from Jakarta to replace 500 000 hectares of Aru forest with sugar cane plantation while the remain 200 000 hectares is just left for environmental protection. Ironically, the poor Aru people know nothing about this plan though a national regulation guarantees an indigenous land right. Currently, a way of life and unique environment of Aru Islands is threatened to be destroyed. Aru people are crying for help. They’ve organized their rally to stop the project because the sweetness of sugar is a bitter taste for them and their environment as well. Let us stand in solidarity with them! #SaveAru


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Aru Jadi Lagu

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“To illustrate Jacky Manuputty reflections http://savearuisland.com/2014/03/25/looking-at-indonesia-from-aru-islands/ watch this video (language bahasa Indonesian) and have a glimpse of the Aru islands. You will see another example how children are getting to school. Because of
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Indonesia’s forest communities victims of ‘legal land grabs’

“That’s why we have to ‪#‎SAVEARU‬: “The government allocates these areas to companies without even consulting the communities. So concessions have been handed out over lands where these communities have lived for hundreds or even thousands of years,” (Saje Dakilwadjir) Ja